Terri’s Blogs: Theatrical

My theatre blogs are usually in response to something in the news or to something I’ve seen or read. For my “Terri’s Top Picks” click on the Recommendations tag. Other regular tags that I use including Inspiring People and Inspiring Projects. For the very latest news, gossip and all-round theatre buzz, check out my Tweets page or follow me on Twitter @TerriPaddock.

Personal |  Theatrical

Q&A video and photos: Relaunching the Lion & Unicorn Theatre as a new fringe destination

How can a 60-seat black box studio above a pub stand out amongst nearly 100 Off-West End and fringe theatres in London? THIS is how. There was palpable excitement in the room on last night at Proforca Theatre Company's industry relaunch of the Lion & Unicorn Theatre, with a very warm reciprocal embrace for the company's collaborative and inclusive approach to programming and making this a true 'destination venue'. For the panel Q&A to discuss the future programming and artist development plans, I was joined on the stage by Proforca artistic director…
By Terri Paddock | 13 March 2019 | , , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >


Call Me Vicky Q&A video and photos: How difficult was it to transition in the 1980s?

It was a great big family affair for my post-show Q&A at Call Me Vicky at the Pleasance Theatre this weekend. The new one-act comedy-drama marks the playwriting debut for sisters Stacey and Nicola Bland, who also perform in the cast, and their mum, dad and nan were in proud attendance. Call Me Vicky is based on the true-life story of Stacey and Nicola's godmother, their mother's best friend. Set in 1980s London, it follows Martin's journey from a council estate at Elephant & Castle and the streets of Soho as he saves…
By Terri Paddock | 26 February 2019 | , , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >


Post-show forum: Taking the All in a Row controversy & conversation offline

A lot has been said about All in a Row online (especially on Twitter around #puppetgate) - about the play itself, its depiction of autism and its use of a puppet in portraying the non-verbal autistic 11-year-old character. Last night we were able to take the conversation offline. I felt a great responsibility in chairing what I view as an incredibly important discussion and, with the show's team, tried to ensure that we were able to address as many of the concerns and controversy that we could in the time available. I also feel it's critical that…
By Terri Paddock | 22 February 2019 | , , , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >


Gently Down the Stream Q&A podcast and photos: Martin Sherman on passing on gay history and happiness

"It's so rare these days to see a play about optimism," the wonderful actor Malcolm Sinclair told me after Wednesday night's performance of Gently Down the Stream at the Park Theatre. Malcolm had attended the press night two days earlier and loved Martin Sherman's new play so much that he returned with his partner and another friend. I have to agree with Malcolm (as, clearly, do most reviewers), and was so pleased to have him there to add his own observations during the post-show discussion with Martin and this UK…
By Terri Paddock | 22 February 2019 | , , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >


The Tempest Q&A video and photos: What happens when Prospero & Miranda becomes a mother-son relationship?

In my first of three post-show Q&As this year with Lazarus Theatre, I was at Greenwich Theatre for this pioneering ensemble company's exciting re-examination of Shakespeare's The Tempest. Sure, we've had Prospero played by a woman before - not least Vanessa Redgrave, Helen Mirren and Harriet Walter - but what happens when you take the gender-flipping of this 400-year-old play even further? Think you know Shakespeare classic The Tempest? But what happens if Prospero is a woman? And Miranda is a young man? How does a mother-son relationship differ from that…
By Terri Paddock | 13 February 2019 | , , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >


Q&A video and photos: What would Bram Stoker think of Dracula staged at The London Library?

The bookworm in me adores everything about libraries and they don't get much more atmospheric, or historic, than The London Library, the world's oldest independent lending library - and now a highly unconventional theatrical venue for Creation Theatre Company's latest offering. Dubbed by Stephen Fry as a “gym of the mind”, The London Library, with its 17 miles of shelves containing more than one million books, has played a central role in the intellectual and cultural life of the nation since 1841. Amongst the many famous authors who have used the…
By Terri Paddock | 12 February 2019 | , , , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >


My Dad’s Gap Year Q&A video and photos: Launching Tom Wright and Rikki Beadle-Blair’s unstoppable collaboration

The Park Theatre was absolutely buzzing last night with two sell-out shows, including in Park 90, Tom Wright's debut play My Dad's Gap Year, which has nearly sold out the rest of its run too. What's the secret alchemy between Wright and his director Rikki Beadle-Blair? I suspect that a key element is their mutual respect for one another, which became abundantly clear at the post-show Q&A I chaired with them last night. Both are multi-talented - writing, directing, performing and producing - so there's a lot feeding into their rapport.…
By Terri Paddock | 8 February 2019 | , , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >


Counting Sheep Q&A video and photos: How do you stage a real-life revolution?

It's only a matter of days until the UK is scheduled to depart the European Union. As anyone who follows me knows, Brexit is an outcome I've been fighting, marching and campaigning against since David Cameron first announced the date for the 2016 referendum.  So to be invited to chair Counting Sheep, in a new co-production with Belarus Free Theatre, particularly at this time, in this climate, was an unbelievable honour - and, frankly, quite emotional. If, like me (to my shame), your knowledge of Ukraine and its corrupt former president Victor Yanukovych is shaky at best,…
By Terri Paddock | 8 February 2019 | , , , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >


The Orchestra Q&A photos: Why don’t we see more revivals of French dramatist Jean Anouilh?

One of the reasons I love chairing post-show Q&As so much is the chance I get to learn new things from incredibly talented and knowledgeable panellists. Last night's event for Jean Anouilh's play The Orchestra at Omnibus Theatre was a special treat as the expert on hand was also an old friend of mine: award-winning director, composer, writer and, in this case, translator Jeremy Sams. Jean Anouilh (1910-1987) was one of the twentieth century's most popular French dramatists. Best known for Antigone, his 1944 adaptation of Sophocles’ classic, Anouilh's work ranged from high…
By Terri Paddock | 6 February 2019 | , , , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >


The Ministry of Biscuits Q&A video and photos: Sharing biscuits and a love of G&S with Philip Reeve and co

Charming, delectable, delicious. And those are just the custard creams... It's not often I get offered biscuits at the post-show Q&As I chair, but at a show called The Ministry of Biscuits, it would have seemed remiss not to. Since its 1998 premiere, this delightful musical has been scaled down to a bijou four-hander performed by The Foundry Group's Brian Mitchell (who also wrote the music and co-wrote book and lyrics with Philip Reeve), David Mounfield, Murray Simon and Amy Sutton. After extensive touring, it's now transferred to Barons Court Theatre…
By Terri Paddock | 1 February 2019 | , , , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >