Terri’s Blogs: Theatrical

My theatre blogs are usually in response to something in the news or to something I’ve seen or read. For my “Terri’s Top Picks” click on the Recommendations tag. Other regular tags that I use including Inspiring People and Inspiring Projects. For the very latest news, gossip and all-round theatre buzz, check out my Tweets page or follow me on Twitter @TerriPaddock.

Personal |  Theatrical

Looking for Gatsby Q&A video and photos: How does F Scott Fitzgerald’s story look from Daisy’s perspective?

Swift but swinging! We had less than twenty minutes for last night's post-show Q&A for new musical Looking for Gatsby but - taking a leaf out of this incredible company's book - we made the most of it. It's amazing how much you can ground you can cover when you're up against the clock! What happens when you retell the story of The Great Gatsby from his lover Daisy Buchanan's perspective? That's the fascinating premise of Looking for Gatsby, the new musical by Linnie Reedman (book, direction) and Joe Evans (music &…
By Terri Paddock | 13 November 2018 | , , , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >


Yerma Q&A video and photos: What toll does the titanic title role take on an actress?

Federico Garcia Lorca spent three months in Cuba in 1930 - six years before he was assassinated (aged just 38) by Franco nationalists in his native Spain. He fell in love with the Caribbean island nation and it with him. And it's this association that inspired Jorge de Juan in his new adaptation of Lorca classic Yerma. He relocates the second play in Lorca's 'rural trilogy' - which, first staged in 1934, came after Blood Wedding (1932) and before his final play The House of Bernarda Alba (1936) - from the…
By Terri Paddock | 11 November 2018 | , , , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >


Soldier On Q&A video and photos: Does a soldier ever really stop being a soldier?

Does a soldier ever stop being a soldier? "No!" shouted several from the audience at last night's post-show discussion for Soldier On at The Other Palace. The play, dubbed "The Full Military Monty", was developed and workshopped with real soldiers and their families and shows how all are affected by PTSD. It's performed by a 16-strong cast, half of whom are veterans themselves. It's also attracting lots of attention from the UK's extended military community. At last night's Q&A, when I asked who in the audience had served or hailed…
By Terri Paddock | 30 October 2018 | , , , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >


A Guide for the Homesick Q&A video and photos: How did Doctors Without Borders & homophobia inspire this new play?

The night after they faced the press, the team behind the European premiere production of A Guide for the Homesick faced a packed audience, most of whom stayed on to take part enthusiastically in our post-show discussion. Ken Urban's play was commissioned in 2011 and had its world premiere last year in Boston. This new production reunites New York-based Urban with British director Jonathan O'Boyle, who helmed his play Sense of an Ending at London's Theatre 503 in 2015. In Urban's new, tense two-hander, Douglas Booth and Clifford Samuel are Jeremy and…
By Terri Paddock | 22 October 2018 | , , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >


The Wider Earth Q&A video and photos: Puppetry evolution & Charles Darwin at the Natural History Museum

The Wider Earth is billed as one of the theatre events of the year - and, on this occasion, that's no exaggeration. What a privilege for me to play a small part in helping to launch this spectacular and historic production, which tells the story of a young Charles Darwin and is staged in a specially created, temporary, 357-seat venue in the Jerwood Gallery at the Natural History Museum (the museum's first-ever performance theatre) just next to the Darwin Centre. The Wider Earth follows the 22-year-old Charles Darwin as he embarks…
By Terri Paddock | 10 October 2018 | , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >


The Sweet Science of Bruising Q&A video and photos: Why’s now the right time for a play about Victorian female boxers?

This weekend, I got to enter the boxing ring at London's Southwark Playhouse to chair a post-show Q&A at Troupe Theatre's world premiere production of Joy Wilkinson's The Sweet Science of Bruising. London, 1869. Four very different Victorian women are drawn into the dark underground world of female boxing by the eccentric Professor Sharp. Controlled by men and constrained by corsets, each finds an unexpected freedom in the boxing ring. As their lives begin to intertwine their journey takes us through grand drawing rooms, bustling theatres and rowdy Southwark pubs where the…
By Terri Paddock | 7 October 2018 | , , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >


Kids Play Q&A video and photos: Talking taboos and teddy bears with Glenn Chandler

When a show has as many twists and turns as Glenn Chandler's KIDS PLAY, there are special challenges in live-streaming and live-tweeting a post-show discussion. Last night, Chander, his London stars David Mullen and Joseph Clarke, myself and the audience at Above the Stag did our best to avoid spoilers. Though it was difficult at points! What will a lonely boy will for love? Theo (Clarke) is a gay 17-year-old student in need of cash. Greg (Mullen) is a married businessman with an odd fetish. When the two meet up in a…
By Terri Paddock | 4 October 2018 | , , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >


Ay, Carmela! Q&A video and photos: Do only the dead remember the Spanish Civil War?

How much do you know about the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939)? Who fought on the side of the Republicans and who for the Nationalists? What happened to those who got caught in the middle, such as Paulino and Carmelo in Jose Sanchis Sinisterra's Ay, Carmela!? In the 1986 stage play, famously made into a 1990 Spanish film, Carmela and Paulino are a couple of travelling entertainers who accidentally cross a border that separates the two opposing sides of the last Spanish Civil War and end up in a town the National Army has just 'liberated'. They're…
By Terri Paddock | 29 September 2018 | , , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >


Where We Began Q&A video and photos: Should where we’re born define where we end up?

Should country of birth define your identity or determine where you end up?  Set in the near-future, Stand and Be Counted Theatre's highly political new play Where We Began imagines a world where a new universal law mandates that everyone must return to where they were born and stay there. Borders are built everywhere and strictly enforced: no communication, and absolutely no travel, across them is permitted. The piece, written by SBC co-founder Rosie MacPherson, was inspired by Tafadzwa Muchenje, who first came into contact with SBC after attending their last production,…
By Terri Paddock | 24 September 2018 | , , , , , , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >


Midnight Q&A video and photos: What would you do if the secret police knocked on your door?

So often with the news these days, parallels are drawn with our turbulent political times and the fascism that swept across Europe in the 1930s, and the question is asked: what would you do if...? Last night, I and the audience at the Union Theatre travelled back to the 1930s care of Midnight, in which the question is not only asked but set to musical refrain. This new British musical by Timothy Knapman (book and lyrics) and Laurence Mark Wythe (music and lyrics) is based on the 2007 play Citizens…
By Terri Paddock | 21 September 2018 | , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >