Terri’s Blogs: Theatrical

My theatre blogs are usually in response to something in the news or to something I’ve seen or read. For my “Terri’s Top Picks” click on the Recommendations tag. Other regular tags that I use including Inspiring People and Inspiring Projects. For the very latest news, gossip and all-round theatre buzz, check out my Tweets page or follow me on Twitter @TerriPaddock.

Personal |  Theatrical

Q&A video and photos: How did Nina Simone inspire Black Is the Color of My Voice?

How much do you know about Nina Simone? Guaranteed: after you see Black Is the Color Of My Voice, the one-woman play with music written by and starring young American theatremaker Apphia Campbell, you will be inspired to learn more. The "High Priestess of Soul" Nina Simone was born Eunice Kathleen Waymon in Tryon, North Caroline in 1933, the sixth of eight children. Though she passed away, aged 70, in 2003, she lives on musically with her enduring standards including "I Put a Spell on You", "Feeling Good", "I Ain't Got…
By Terri Paddock | 3 July 2019 | , , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >


Citysong Q&A video and photos: Comparing accents, tattoos & London vs Dublin theatre scenes

Dylan Coburn Gray's Citysong won the 2017 Verity Bargate Award for new and emerging playwrights and now receives its world premiere in this acclaimed co-production between Dublin's Abbey Theatre and London's Soho Theatre. I was mesmerised by this time-hopping, Dublin-set urban poem - originally commissioned for a spoken word festival - which, over the course of ninety minutes, captures one day and a multitude of moments and feelings in the lives of three generations of an Irish family. "Let's begin with an ending" An ensemble of six play family members, narrators…
By Terri Paddock | 23 June 2019 | , , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >


Q&A photos: Exploring the cosmos with Matthew Broderick, Elizabeth McGovern and The Starry Messenger cast

How fitting to hold a post-show Q&A for The Starry Messenger during Loneliness Awareness Week. Kenneth Lonergan's beautifully delicate play considers the torment of, as New York Times' critic Ben Brantley puts it: "fallible, contradictory, lonely souls who can never quite articulate what’s missing in their lives but always feel the void" In the play, set in the 1990s, Mark Williams (played by Matthew Broderick) is lost. An astronomer at New York City’s Planetarium, he feels a closer connection to the infinite, starry sky than to his job or even to his wife Anne (Elizabeth…
By Terri Paddock | 19 June 2019 | , , , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >


Vincent River Q&A video and photos: Tackling homophobia through talking and education

Philip Ridley's Vincent River was premiered at Hampstead Theatre in 2000 and has been revived fairly regularly in the intervening years, including this production which was first seen at the Park Theatre last year and has now transferred to the West End's Trafalgar Studios, where an earlier production ran in 2007. How worried should we be that the play seems ever-timely? Thrilling, heartbreaking and darkly humorous by turns, Vincent River is now seen as one of the most powerful explorations of hate crime - and society’s need to crush ‘difference’ - ever written.…
By Terri Paddock | 5 June 2019 | , , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >


Q&A video and photos: How The Wardrobe Ensemble devised Education Education Education… to a 1990s soundtrack

Remember D:Ream's "Things Can Only Get Better"? I was bopping along in my seat to that New Labour anthem and so many other chart-topping hits from my youth before curtain up at Education Education Education last night at Trafalgar Studios.  The music from the 1990s forms a backbone to this love-letter to the decade and the cast's own schooldays. And, at the post-show discussion, I asked The Wardrobe Ensemble company members about this - and challenged them to name their own favourite track - and was fascinated to hear about the role…
By Terri Paddock | 4 June 2019 | , , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >


The Comedy About a Bank Robbery Q&A video and photos: Stealing more time with the mischief-makers

I closed out #MischiefMay, celebrating the world-dominating achievements of the comedy masters at Mischief Theatre, with my second of two post-show Q&As to the company's two current West End hits. The Comedy About a Bank Robbery was the third West End offering from Mischief, following The Play That Goes Wrong (still running at the Duchess Theatre) and Peter Pan Goes Wrong (which returns for a Christmas run at Alexandra Palace), and recently celebrated its third birthday at the Criterion Theatre at Piccadilly Circus. It's Summer 1958 in this fast-paced comedy caper.…
By Terri Paddock | 31 May 2019 | , , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >


#MischiefMay: Celebrating 1,999 performances (sort of) with The Play That Goes Wrong‘s West End cast

#MischiefMay is all about celebrating the world-dominating success of the comedy genius of Mischief Theatre onstage (running on all continents except Antarctica) and, increasingly, onscreen. I'm delighted to play a small part of this month's mischievous activities with back-to-back post-show Q&As to Mischief's two current West End hits, starting last night with The Play That Goes Wrong. Mischief's breakthrough hit - written by Henry Lewis, Jonathan Sayer and Henry Shields - premiered at London's Old Red Lion Theatre in 2012, moved to Trafalgar Studios in 2012 and transferred to the…
By Terri Paddock | 24 May 2019 | , , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >


Salome Q&A video and photos: What would the censor have made of this regendered version of Oscar Wilde’s play?

After The Tempest and Lord of the Flies, my last of three post-show Q&As with Lazarus Theatre company for their 2019 season at Greenwich Theatre was last night to their new version of Oscar Wilde's Salome, adapted and directed (and designed!) by artistic director Ricky Dukes. Ending on a (messy!) high. “Salomé, Salomé, dance for me. I pray thee dance for me...” Written (originally in French) in 1891, the same year as the decidedly different Lady Windermere's Fan and A Woman of No Importance premiered, Salome was banned by the Lord Chamberlain and not seen publicly…
By Terri Paddock | 22 May 2019 | , , , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >


Q&A photos and video: What would the late Michel Legrand think of this chamber version of his musical Amour?

I'm in love with love... or more precisely with Amour, as in the lushly romantic Michel Legrand musical fantasy now receiving its UK professional premiere at Charing Cross Theatre. Amour is set in 1950 in post-war Paris where shy civil servant Dusoleil (Gary Tushaw) lives alone and works diligently in a dreary office. To pass the time, he writes letters to his mother and daydreams about the beautiful Isabelle (Anna O'Byrne), who is kept locked away by her controlling husband (Alasdair Harvey). Then Dusoleil miraculously gains the ability to walk…
By Terri Paddock | 15 May 2019 | , , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >


Q&A video and photos: Why is the Coronet the perfect home for The Glass Piano court tale?

Visits to the Coronet Theatre, until last week known as The Print Room at the Coronet, make me miss the days when I lived in Notting Hill (or rather, near enough, Ladbroke Grove). Last week, I went to attend the venue's relaunch and season announcement under its new-old name; last night, I returned to chair a post-show Q&A at the world premiere of Alix Sobler's The Glass Piano, specially programmed to launch this fresh chapter in the building's history. After years of gradual restoration since the Print Room moved into the…
By Terri Paddock | 9 May 2019 | , , , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >