Terri’s Blogs: Theatrical

My theatre blogs are usually in response to something in the news or to something I’ve seen or read. For my “Terri’s Top Picks” click on the Recommendations tag. Other regular tags that I use including Inspiring People and Inspiring Projects. For the very latest news, gossip and all-round theatre buzz, check out my Tweets page or follow me on Twitter @TerriPaddock.

Personal |  Theatrical

Groan Ups post-show video and photos: With the original Mischief Theatre company and co-writers

As part of an ongoing series, I've chaired post-show talks with various Mischief Theatre casts this year, all of whom waxed lyrical about the brilliance of the company founders. Last night, I had a chance to pose questions to those original mischief-makers themselves. Co-writers Henry Lewis, Jonathan Sayer and Henry Shields and fellow founding members Nancy Zamit, Charlie Russell and Dave Hearn met at LAMDA drama school, where they founded Mischief in 2008. After years of presenting work at the Edinburgh Fringe, they had their breakthrough with multi-award-winning farce The…
By Terri Paddock | 18 October 2019 | , , , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >


The Girl Who Fell post-show video and photos: How is social media affecting our mental health?

I feel like I've known writer Sarah Rutherford for years... that's one of the positives of social media. (We follow each other on Twitter.) The irony is it's her new play, The Girl Who Fell, about some of the negatives of social media that finally precipitated my meeting her in person. And what a great discussion we had last night at Trafalgar Studios after what was only the second-ever performance of this brand-new play, produced by Stage Traffic (a connection that Sarah Rutherford also has social media to thank for). "It’s meaningless. It’s…
By Terri Paddock | 17 October 2019 | , , , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >


Post-show video and photos: Wrestling with absurdism, anthropomorphism & coercive control in Mites

A philosophising cat, a famished dog and a family of mites all make appearances - and strong impressions - in Mites, a new play by up-and-coming young British playwright James Mannion, written in the best traditions of the Theatre of the Absurd. Ruth, a lonely woman abandoned by her husband, lives in isolation with her beloved cat Bartholomew. When she's visited by a pest controller named Ken, who's come to rid her infestation of the titular creatures, she becomes convinced he's her unfaithful husband Kenneth returned. As she - and we - become…
By Terri Paddock | 16 October 2019 | , , , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >


A Day in the Death of Joe Egg Q&A video and photos: What did the late Peter Nichols think of this historic West End casting?

I was back at Trafalgar Studios last night for this much-anticipated revival of Peter Nichols' 1967 masterpiece A Day in the Death of Joe Egg. And there was so much to discuss with this production, making history for a number of reasons. Along with Passion Play and Privates on Parade, A Day in the Death of Joe Egg remains one of Peter Nichols' best known and most frequently performed plays. The black comedy was inspired by Nichols' own experience of bringing up his disabled daughter, who died at the age of 11. In it,…
By Terri Paddock | 8 October 2019 | , , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >


The Permanent Way Q&A video and photos: Why is a play about railway privatisation more relevant than ever?

I was lucky enough to see the original Out of Joint production of The Permanent Way at the National Theatre in 2003. I remember being horrified by David Hare's verbatim play about railway privatisation, based on first-hand accounts, including the people behind the body counts of the four major rail disasters between 1997 and 2002. With Alexander Lass' excellent revival at The Vaults, evocatively staged beneath Waterloo Station, the rumble of the trains creating the soundscape, Hare's play has not only lost none of its power - it's also become evident to…
By Terri Paddock | 25 September 2019 | , , , , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >


Danelaw Q&A video and photos: How do you find sympathy for white supremacists?

Can you be a racist if you don't think you are? Is there a difference between racism and 'racist attitudes'? How do you find sympathy for white supremacists? By finding sympathy are we making excuses? Peter Hamilton's new updated staging of his 2005 play Danelaw prompted some serious discussion at my post-show Q&A at the Old Red Lion Theatre. The play, directed in this new production by former Old Red Lion artistic director Ken McClymont, centres on racist football hooligan Cliff who, while serving time for assaulting an Asian man…
By Terri Paddock | 22 September 2019 | , , , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >


The Comedy About a Bank Robbery Q&A video and photos: From UK-wide tour to the West End with a new cast

What fun to return to the Criterion Theatre to see a brand-new cast put their stamp on Mischief Theatre's The Comedy About A Bank Robbery, as the first in a series of monthly post-show Q&As with the comic geniuses. In fact, while new to London, many of them recent drama school graduates making their West End debuts, this company has already clocked up over 300 performances of The Comedy About a Bank Robbery, having starred in the show’s first UK and Ireland tour, which visited more than 30 venues up and…
By Terri Paddock | 20 September 2019 | , , , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >


HighTide Festival: In conversation with director Deborah Warner

At this year's annual HighTide Festival in Aldeburgh, Suffolk, I was privileged to chair an hour-long "In Conversation With" platform discussion with legendary director Deborah Warner, reflecting on nearly 40 years in the business. Since launching her career at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe in 1980, Warner has gone on to direct plays and operas at the Almeida Theatre, Royal Shakespeare Company, National Theatre, English National Opera, Royal Opera House, Glyndebourne and many other leading theatres and opera houses around the world, including in the West End, on Broadway and myriad…
By Terri Paddock | 17 September 2019 | , , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >


The Eyes of the Night Q&A video and photos: Using darkness to enlighten audiences about visual impairment

A middle-aged businesswoman hires a blind man to spend an hour with her in a hotel room. Why are they really there? Will she be able to experience the darkness in order to see the light? The Eyes of the Night, written by one of Spain's leading playwrights Paloma Pedrero, headlines the second Contemporary Spanish Playwriting Season at the Cervantes Theatre, London's home of Spanish and Latin American drama. Pedrero first wrote the piece more than 20 years ago, when it was staged in Cuba, and has not returned to…
By Terri Paddock | 14 September 2019 | , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >


At Last Q&A video and photos: How worried are you about the direction the UK is heading?

Are you worried about the state of politics and society in the UK today? That's the question I asked at the start of last night's post-show Q&A at London's Lion & Unicorn Theatre. The hands of all my panellists and nearly everyone sitting across from them in the audience shot up. Proforca Theatre's new play At Last, co-written by James Lewis and Alexander Knott, speaks to our collective worries and fears. The action is set in the present day but, while conceived during and clearly fuelled by divisions cleaved since the…
By Terri Paddock | 13 September 2019 | , , , , , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >