Terri’s Blogs: Personal

Occasionally, I have thoughts that have either have nothing to do with theatre – astonishing – or that cross other private boundaries. You can find these ramblings here.

Personal |  Theatrical

The House of the Spirits post-show video and photos: How does a country – and a family – recover from dictatorship?

Are you fans of Isabel Allende's The House of the Spirits? Allende's multi-award-winning debut novel, released in 1982, charts four generations of one family from the 1920s and the 1970s, and how tightly intertwined their personal fortunes are with political winds of change. Though the story is set in an unnamed Latin American country, it's strongly reminiscent of Allende's own homeland of Chile, where fascist dictator General Pinochet came to power in 1973 after a military coup. How much do you know about Pinochet's regime, during which thousands of citizens…
By Terri Paddock | 4 November 2019 | , , , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >


The Good Scout post-show video and photos: How worried should we be about parallels between the 1930s and today?

While MPs were voting for an election that is likely to accelerate the UK's lurch to the right, I was back at Above The Stag Theatre last night talking about the increasingly worrying parallels - and historic dominoes - between the 1930s and today. Is it any wonder that The Good Scout left me in tears, even on second viewing? Have you heard about the cultural exchange between the British Boy Scouts and the Hitler Youth in the lead-up to the Second World War? Inspired by these incredible, little-known true events, writer/director Glenn Chandler…
By Terri Paddock | 30 October 2019 | , , , , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >


The Permanent Way Q&A video and photos: Why is a play about railway privatisation more relevant than ever?

I was lucky enough to see the original Out of Joint production of The Permanent Way at the National Theatre in 2003. I remember being horrified by David Hare's verbatim play about railway privatisation, based on first-hand accounts, including the people behind the body counts of the four major rail disasters between 1997 and 2002. With Alexander Lass' excellent revival at The Vaults, evocatively staged beneath Waterloo Station, the rumble of the trains creating the soundscape, Hare's play has not only lost none of its power - it's also become evident to…
By Terri Paddock | 25 September 2019 | , , , , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >


At Last Q&A video and photos: How worried are you about the direction the UK is heading?

Are you worried about the state of politics and society in the UK today? That's the question I asked at the start of last night's post-show Q&A at London's Lion & Unicorn Theatre. The hands of all my panellists and nearly everyone sitting across from them in the audience shot up. Proforca Theatre's new play At Last, co-written by James Lewis and Alexander Knott, speaks to our collective worries and fears. The action is set in the present day but, while conceived during and clearly fuelled by divisions cleaved since the…
By Terri Paddock | 13 September 2019 | , , , , , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >


Q&A video and photos: What would Pete Buttigieg think of his Jekyll & Hyde incarnation?

Arrows & Traps' 18th production in its five-year history is also its tenth at London's Brockley Jack Theatre, where it is now an associate company, and its third in a Gothic trilogy. And it's a corker. Following versions of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein and Bram Stoker's Dracula, Arrows & Traps founder, writer and director Ross McGregor, has turned his hand to Robert Louis Stevenson's 1866 classic The Strange Case of Jekyll & Hyde and given it an ultra-modern and politically charged makeover. The story of man's duality, an epic battle between good and…
By Terri Paddock | 8 September 2019 | , , , , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >


Q&A video and photos: How did Nina Simone inspire Black Is the Color of My Voice?

How much do you know about Nina Simone? Guaranteed: after you see Black Is the Color Of My Voice, the one-woman play with music written by and starring young American theatremaker Apphia Campbell, you will be inspired to learn more. The "High Priestess of Soul" Nina Simone was born Eunice Kathleen Waymon in Tryon, North Caroline in 1933, the sixth of eight children. Though she passed away, aged 70, in 2003, she lives on musically with her enduring standards including "I Put a Spell on You", "Feeling Good", "I Ain't Got…
By Terri Paddock | 3 July 2019 | , , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >


Tony’s Last Tape Q&A video and photos: What would Tony Benn have thought of Brexit, Corbyn & this play about him?

This past Wednesday (3 April 2019) would have been Tony Benn's 94th birthday. Great celebratory timing for the return of Tony's Last Tape, the one-man play celebrating the Labour firebrand, who died in 2014. And last night, I was delighted to return to the play myself and to chair a warm and celebratory post-show discussion. Many in the audience at Clapham's Omnibus Theatre knew and were influenced by Tony Benn and were happy to share memories and thoughts on what he would think about the play as well as today's political situation, including…
By Terri Paddock | 6 April 2019 | , , , , , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >


Half Me, Half You Q&A video and photos: It’s not easy to talk about racism & hate crime, but it’s necessary

Did seeing fascist Tommy Robinson denouncing Muslims and immigrants on a big screen in Whitehall terrify you? What are the long-term consequences of today's political rhetoric in Trump's America and Brexit Britain? How much does it fuel hate crimes against minority groups? How worried should we be? What can we do about it?   Debut playwright Liane Grant was inspired to write Half Me, Half You, set in Trump's America today and then 16 years in the future, after watching the president praise "very fine people" taking part in white supremacist demonstrations…
By Terri Paddock | 2 April 2019 | , , , , , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >


Counting Sheep Q&A video and photos: How do you stage a real-life revolution?

It's only a matter of days until the UK is scheduled to depart the European Union. As anyone who follows me knows, Brexit is an outcome I've been fighting, marching and campaigning against since David Cameron first announced the date for the 2016 referendum.  So to be invited to chair Counting Sheep, in a new co-production with Belarus Free Theatre, particularly at this time, in this climate, was an unbelievable honour - and, frankly, quite emotional. If, like me (to my shame), your knowledge of Ukraine and its corrupt former president Victor Yanukovych is shaky at best,…
By Terri Paddock | 8 February 2019 | , , , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >


An Honourable Man Q&A video and photos: Has there ever been a more poisonous time in UK politics? (Insiders’ views)

Populism, patriotism, political theatre, predictions for Brexit and the fast-paced nature of life-imitating-art-imitating-life were amongst the topics covered in an incredibly good-natured discussion across a wide partisan spectrum at the post-show debate I chaired on Wednesday night at the premiere of An Honourable Man. Michael McManus' play had a sell-out, try-out week in June, which attracted praise from political commentators including Guardian columnist Polly Toynbee, Times columnist Matthew Parris, House of Cards author Michael Dobbs and Another Country playwright Julian Mitchell. It has since been revised and updated. In an imagined…
By Terri Paddock | 22 November 2018 | , , , , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >