Tristan Bates Theatre

Home-Tag: Tristan Bates Theatre

Post-show video and photos: Wrestling with absurdism, anthropomorphism & coercive control in Mites

By |2020-01-25T15:35:27+00:0016 October 2019|

A philosophising cat, a famished dog and a family of mites all make appearances - and strong impressions - in Mites, a new play by young British playwright James Mannion, written in the best traditions of the Theatre of the Absurd.

Half Me, Half You Q&A video and photos: It’s not easy to talk about racism & hate crime, but it’s necessary

By |2020-01-25T23:37:11+00:002 April 2019|

Did seeing fascist Tommy Robinson denouncing Muslims and immigrants on a big screen in Whitehall terrify you? What are the long-term consequences of today's political rhetoric in Trump's America and Brexit Britain?

Do You Love This Planet? Q&A video and photos: Philosophy, individual responsibility and climate change

By |2020-04-16T22:45:37+01:007 March 2019|

How often do you ask yourself this question: Do you love this planet? No, but seriously, do you really love this planet? How much?

‘I walk around naked a lot more’: Video and photos from all-female Nuns Q&A

By |2020-01-26T00:55:57+00:0021 January 2019|

I started this past weekend in a room full of wonderful, talented and inspiring women (and some great male allies) at London's Tristan Bates Theatre chairing a BOSSY all-female panel after a performance of Robert Luxford's Nuns.

Q&A video and photos: Why has Italy largely forgotten what happened at San Domino?

By |2020-02-01T22:50:39+00:0010 June 2018|

Before the performance at Tristan Bates Theatre, the 16-strong company of San Domino entertain theatregoers in the bar with some jaunty patriotic songs, with which they lead them into the auditorium.

Q&A podcast and photos: What does Marlowe’s Edward II tell us about identity and gay rights?

By |2020-03-27T16:07:26+00:001 September 2017|

The plays may have been written 420-odd years apart, but I was really struck by how many parallels there were between the discussion I hosted last week, to the European premiere of Jordan Tannahill's Late Company, and the one I hosted last night, to Christopher Marlowe's 16th-century classic Edward II.