Terri’s Blogs: Theatrical

My theatre blogs are usually in response to something in the news or to something I’ve seen or read. For my “Terri’s Top Picks” click on the Recommendations tag. Other regular tags that I use including Inspiring People and Inspiring Projects. For the very latest news, gossip and all-round theatre buzz, check out my Tweets page or follow me on Twitter @TerriPaddock.

Personal |  Theatrical

My theatre diary: Guards at the Taj, Junkyard, Waiting for God and Sea Fret

Here's a round-up of productions I've seen it recent weeks which I haven't already covered in Press Passes (do please dance your way as soon as you can into seeing both An American in Paris and 42nd Street in the West End) or other blogs. What do all four of these have in common? (I like to make links, as you probably know!) They are all four premieres. Rajiv Joseph's Guards at the Taj had its world premiere at New York's Atlantic Theater in 2015 and now gets its European…
By Terri Paddock | 24 April 2017 | , , , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >


Inspired by David Baddiel: My top ten most highly trolled tweets

As a Twitter geek, one of the things I enjoyed most about David Baddiel's latest one-man show My Family: Not the Sitcom, which is now enjoying its second West End run at the Playhouse Theatre after premiering last year at the Menier Chocolate Factory, is how he so successfully employs social media in his storytelling. As Baddiel makes clear himself, My Family is not about social media. (It's about, as the title indicates, his family and more specifically his late mother's openly conducted, extra-marital affair and his still-living father's slide…
By Terri Paddock | 23 April 2017 | , , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >


What if The Life characters met their peers in Guys & Dolls & 42nd Street?

One little postcode in New York City has been attracting a lot of stage real estate in London in recent years: the blocks around Times Square. The area is, of course, well known to theatre lovers around the globe as Broadway - both the physical street and the wider showbiz environment it encapsulates - runs straight through it. But of the three American musicals set in the locale that we've seen in London recently - Guys & Dolls, which is now touring after an extended West End run; 42nd Street, recently opened with…
By Terri Paddock | 16 April 2017 | , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >


Photos, video & podcast: Creating a musical out of wartime prejudice in Miss Nightingale

What a great way to get the Bank Holiday weekend off with a swing. Last night, I hosted a post-show Q&A at MISS NIGHTINGALE. This original British musical is now in its sixth iteration - musicals, as Sondheim says, aren't written but re-written - since starting life as a short piece in Ipswich and at the King's Head Theatre in 2011. Since then, it's toured the UK extensively and has now transferred for an eight-week season in a full-scale production at The Vaults, the perfect underground venue, beneath the rumbling trains…
By Terri Paddock | 14 April 2017 | , , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >


Press Pass: Everything you need to know about Alfie Boe & Katherine Jenkins in Carousel

After successes with Sunset Boulevard and Sweeney Todd, English National Opera continues its annual headline-grabbing foray into musical theatre with Rodgers & Hammerstein's Carousel. As with the previous ENO musicals of the past two years, this production is produced by Michael Linnit and Michael Grade (who are also behind the current big-budget production of another Broadway classic, 42nd Street, just opened at the Theatre Royal Drury Lane) and directed by Lonny Price. And, whereas Sweeney had Bryn Terfel and Emma Thompson and Sunset (now on Broadway) had Glenn Close, Carousel boasts two more big names…
By Terri Paddock | 12 April 2017 | , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >


Press Pass: Everything you need to know about 42nd Street (and Kate Middleton!)

The second massive New York import in less than a month, 42nd Street brought its lullaby of Broadway to the Theatre Royal Drury Lane last night. In addition to their transatlantic journeys, An American in Paris and 42nd Street are both dance-based shows - with big budgets (£8 million is the word on the latter), huge casts and stunning designs - that have won over critics in dramatic fashion. And yet, they're very different beasts, as many note this morning. 42nd Street is the mother of all tap musicals and, with a staggering…
By Terri Paddock | 5 April 2017 | , , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >


Bra-waving, toe-tapping and female solidarity: The Girls and Stepping Out

If you're seeking life affirmation, celebrations of female solidarity (of a quintessentially British variety) and general uplift, my two current West End recommendations that tick all three boxes are The Girls, Tim Firth and Gary Barlow's new musical adaptation of the story of the Calendar Girls from Yorkshire, and Maria Friedman's revival of Richard Harris' 1984 comedy Stepping Out, which revolves around a weekly tap dance class help in a north London church hall. On the evening I attended The Girls, I was in a particularly low place, not helped by…
By Terri Paddock | 2 April 2017 | , , , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >


Q&A photos and podcast: A return to Brechtian politics via The Caucasian Chalk Circle

What would Bertolt Brecht have made of Donald Trump? Brecht's "epic theatre" was sparked by the rise of Nazism in 1930s Germany. Many pundits have likened the political period we've now entered - with Trump in the Oval Office, Brexit under way and hard-right populism on the rise across Europe - with that dark decade of the twentieth century. Are modern theatremakers up to the Brechtian challenge? And can theatre actually make a difference in the face of such upheaval? After an acclaimed season at Brockley Jack last January, Lazarus…
By Terri Paddock | 31 March 2017 | , , , , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >


Take two: Tom Stoppard’s Rosencrantz & Travesties, plus future fantasy casting

I'm pleased that the Old Vic has added a week to the run of its 50th anniversary production of Tom Stoppard's Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, now booking until 6 May - it gives me another chance to tell you to go see it. There's a special thrill seeing Stoppard's breakthrough play back on the same stage where it first premiered five decades ago. And David Leveaux's fine production - with Daniel Radcliffe and Joshua McGuire as the two minor characters from Shakespeare's Hamlet who now take starring roles in their…
By Terri Paddock | 28 March 2017 | , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >


Press Pass: Everything you need to know about An American in Paris

Here's what London is crying out for: an escape to Paris. And not the Paris of Marine Le Pen or any other modern foes and woes, but the sumptuous Hollywood Golden Age version now bursting into technicolour life onstage at the West End's Dominion Theatre via New York and, yes, appropriately, Paris. It's a slew of five-star reviews this morning for An American in Paris, Christopher Wheeldon's blockbuster adaptation of the 1951 film classic, with Robert Fairchild and Leanne Cope dancing their way into critics hearts as American GI Jerry…
By Terri Paddock | 22 March 2017 | , , , , , | 0 comments | Read More >